To Google+, or Not To Google+

With Google opening up its Plus social networking service to brands last week, the question we have been considering is whether it’s worth our time actively using the new brand pages.

Let me say before going any further though, you should definitely reserve a page in Google+ for your brand. It only takes a couple of minutes to register your page and you’ll ensure you won’t get hijacked by brand squatters.

Now, onto the question at hand… is it worth time and investment to create and maintain a fully functioning presence?

We can get an insight into the relative popularity of each service by looking at data from the Share buttons that proliferate across the web these days. We can use this as an indicator of the relative importance of each service.

For our study we looked took a sample of news and tech news websites: BBC, CNN, Guardian, New York Times, The Telegraph, Mashable and EConsultancy. Of those, only the The Telegraph, Mashable and EConsultancy have added Google+ sharing to their site.

Next we took the top 5 stories from each site at the time we did the survey and looked at the number of shares on each service:

Facebook

Twitter

LinkedIn

Google+

Telegraph

       

968

577

54

16

60%

36%

3%

1%

Mashable

       

610

5211

1684

108

8%

68%

22%

1%

EConsultancy

       

43

311

39

22

10%

75%

9%

5%

So there you have it, according to our admittedly rather unscientific survey, Google+ represents less than 5% of sharing activity on sites that have a Google+ button, and a much smaller percentage of overall sharing activity given that most mainstream sites do not have a Google+ button.

On that basis we have decided not to spend time maintaining a Google+ page (yet).

Have you created a Google+ page? What results are you getting from it?

Why do people connect with brands on social media?

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Do people have different reasons to connect to brands on Facebook vs. Twitter? There were some startling differences highlighted in last week’s report from ExactTarget

For Facebook, the primary reasons are all about getting discounts and free stuff. For Twitter it’s all about information and keeping up to date.

This verifies what we have long suspected. If you’re a retailer, into discounts and daily deals, or you’re a B2C business, Facebook is the place to be. On the other hand, if want to position your brand as an authority in its industry, you’re a B2B business, or you sell bespoke services, Twitter is your more natural home.

Video: The ROI of Social Media

Are you still trying to persuade your boss, partners or colleagues about the business value of social media?  This could help…

Here’s a video of CubeSocial CEO Linda Cheung at a recent Ariadne Capital/Entrepreneur Country event on the topic of the ROI of social media.

CubeSocial CEO Linda Cheung on the ROI of Social Media

Linda explains the value we have gained from social media, and also shows case studies of law firms using social media to win business.

The video is well worth a few minutes of your time. To quote a few of the live tweets from the event:

Linda Cheung hits it out of the park. Interesting, insightful, helpful presentation. And not an ad in sight. #ECWorkshop

Excellent coverage & energy from @LindaCheungUK of @cubesocial about the social & economic benefits of adapting to social media. #ECWorkshop

Very clever of @LindaCheungUK to use lawyers as her Twitter case study. If they can benefit, any sector can. #ECWorkshop

Shame no room for questions after talks, sure there would be a heap for @LindaCheungUK ‘s v enjoyable presso #ECworkshop #AVGevents

If you are organising an event and would like to ask Linda to speak, please contact us.